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Mediterranean flavors at Pita Way

Brandon Bahoura earned a business marketing degree from Oakland University in 2007 and opened his first business, Pita Way in Independence Township, this past April. "I always planned to open up my own business," said Bahoura , 26, of West Bloomfield....more >>
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Spotlight's new sprung floor to help dancers' feet

With more than 20 years of dance experience, Wendy Harris knows the difference a floor can make. "Dancing on concrete floors, tiles with no give, and the shin splints and leg pain that comes with them I know what safe flooring is," said Harris, owner of Spotlight Dance Center....more >>
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Born September 3rd
1875: Ferdinand Porsche, automotive engineer, designer of the Volkswagen in 1934 and the Porsche sports car in 1950.
1894: Richard Niebuhr, theologian.
1907: Carl Anderson, physicist and 1936 Nobel prize winner for his discovery of the positron.
1914: Dixie Lee Ray, Chair of the Atomic Energy Commission who received the U.N. Peace Prize in 1977.
1927: Hugh Sidey, news correspondent and author of John F. Kennedy, President.
September 3rd
in history
1346: Edward III of England begins the siege of Calais, along the coast of France.
1650: The English under Cromwell defeat a superior Scottish army under David Leslie at the Battle of Dunbar.
1777: The American flag (stars & stripes), approved by Congress on June 14th, is carried into battle for the first time by a force under General William Maxwell.
1783: The Treaty of Paris is signed by Great Britain and the new United States, formally bringing the American Revolution to an end.
1838: Frederick Douglass escapes slavery disguised as a sailor. He would later write The Narrative Life of Frederick Douglass, his memoirs about slave life. At Douglass' home in Washington, D.C., visitors can learn about his successes--and his disappointments.