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Athletic booster Jim Reis files for school board seat

The Chairman of the Oxford Turf Committee is throwing his hat into the ring for the open school board seat in the upcoming November election. Jim Reis will be running for school board seat left by Doug Myer, who chose not to seek re-election....more >>
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OHS flagpole dedicated to veterans

Prior to the big Wildcats/Dragons football game Aug. 26, a brand new flagpole and American flag were dedicated to all the brave men and women in Oxford who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces....more >>
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Born October 4th
1884: Damon Runyon, journalist and short story writer.
1895: Buster (Joseph F.) Keaton, star of silent film comedies including Sherlock, Jr. and The General.
1919: Rene Marques, Puerto Rican playwright and short story writer.
1923: Charlton Heston, American film actor.
1928: Alvin Toffler, writer and futurist.
October 4th
in history
1861: The Union ship USS South Carolina captures two Confederate blockade runners outside of New Orleans, La. Father John B. Tabb, an unreconstructed Rebel to the end, served the Confederacy aboard blockade runners.
1874: Kiowa leader Satanta, known as the Orator of the Plains, surrenders in Darlington, Texas. He is later sent to the state penitentiary, where he commits suicide October 11, 1878. The life of Satanta.
1905: Orville Wright pilots the first flight longer than 30 minutes. The flight lasted 33 minutes, 17 seconds and covered 21 miles. The Virginia Air and Space Center is home to the Great Aerodrome, which almost beat the Wrights into the air.
1914: The first German Zeppelin raids London. The J.V. Martin Kitten failed at intercepting Zeppelins.
1957: Sputnik 1, the first man-made satellite, is launched, beginning the space race. The satellite, built by Valentin Glushko, weighed 184 pounds and was launched by a converted Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM). Sputnik orbited the earth every 96 minutes at a maximum height of 584 miles. In 1958, it reentered the earth's atmosphere and burned up. Just nine months after President John F. Kennedy called for the U.S. to put a man on the moon before 1970, Mercury astronaut John Glenn became the first American to orbit the Earth.